Worker’s Compensation


The Workers Compensation Act was established to ensure workers and their families of medical treatment, temporary wage replacement, and disability benefits in the event of an on the job injury. In general, benefits are available to those employees injured in the course and scope of their employment. However there are many statutory rules and regulations determining when and what type of benefits are available. The state can impose a drug or alcohol test on the employee to test whether or not the employee was under the influence. Worker’s compensation can be denied if test results come back positive. Compensation may also be denied if injuries were self-inflicted, meaning the employee was violating a job policy.

Workers Comp Lawyer

Accident Report Tips

Notify your supervisor if you receive a work-related injury. The longer you wait to report your injury, the more chances are of losing your right to collect worker’s compensation.

Most employers will have a request form for those inquiring about worker’s compensation. The form will consist of questions such as, name of the injury, including every body part affected by the injury, how the accident occurred, when and where the accident happened, other parties involved, and medical treatment you have undergone.

Following the claim, you want to make sure you keep copies of all documents. These reports may include the forms you filled out and documents received, notes on how your injury affected your job, medical reports, and receipts for out-of-pocket expenses.